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GET TO KNOW GEORGE & SUZY

Visit the home of American Abstract Artists George L.K. Morris and Suzy Frelinghuysen, set on a 46-acre estate in the heart of Lenox, Massachusetts. View their paintings, frescoes, and sculpture; experience their exquisite collection of American and European Cubist Art.

FMH&S lends painting to Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition

Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio is lending a painting to the Met's exhibit, Cubism and the Trompe L'oeil Tradition opening Ocober 20th through January 22, 2023. This exhibit offers a new view of Cubism by demonstrating its engagement with the age-old tradition of trompe l’oeil painting. Meaning “deceives the eye”, trompe l’oeil beguiles the viewer with perceptual games, blurring the “real” world in 3D with fiction, a two-dimensional picture plane. 

George L.K. Morris acquired this 1914 collage with watercolor and charcoal by Cubist Juan Gris in 1937 titled, Compotier Sur Une Nappe a Rayures (Fruit dish on a striped tablecloth) through his association with A.E. Gallatin, the artist and founder of the Museum of Living Art. Morris was Gallatin’s curator and together they bought such monumental paintings as Picasso’s Three Musicians and Leger’s The City, both of which were later donated to the Philadelphia Museum.

The 17 ¾”x14 ½” collage incorporates classic Cubist hallmarks of a still life composition and deconstruction of some elements. Using mimicry of material and coded references to current events with the use of new print media were also well used Cubist devices and they competed to invent even more ways to confound the viewer.

  

Our feature in Berkshire Magazine's "The House that Modernists Built"

"The Frelinghuysen Morris House & Studio is a modernist dream--displaying furniture by modern masters, original frescoes by the artists who lived there, and a collection of abstract and cubist art gathered by Morris to help with his own artistic development.  He amassed a sterling collection, including works by Fernand Leger, Juan Gris, Pablo Picasso and other seminal artists who were creating a new sensibility that was destined to define an era." Read the full article by writer Ellen Spear and photographer Jimmy ienner, Jr.Click here to read.

 

Closed for the Season--See you next Spring!

We are closed for the season.  Thank you for making it such a memorable one with all of your encouraging comments.

“A revelation! Docents are fabulous.” – Liz

“Beautiful grounds, wonderful walk, video and Koi Pond! Artwork is amazing! Thank you!” -Lindsay and Marshal

“I was driven to tears, thank you.” -Avis

“A real highlight of our trip! So glad we finally got here!” -Laura

“Enjoyed the interactive discussion and learning more about looking at abstract art. Thank you.” -Zoe

“We love mid century modern and this was a great addition to our exploration of that period!”- John

“I learned more about viewing art today than in the rest of my life. Kudos to Kinney!”-Mary and Alan

“I’ve been all over the Berkshires, but this is the crown jewel!”-Hannah and Rodney

“After a lifetime of visiting museums, I can honestly say there is no one like you!”-David and Richard

“I consider myself an intermediate to advanced art lecture attendee… the lecture I attended at your museum really opened a new world for me and now I appreciate modern art even more. What a gift!” -Abby

 

 

 

"Suzy Frelinghuysen's careers as an artist and opera singer on view" Berkshire Eagle feature

"From a young age, Suzy Frelinghuysen had two artistic passions — painting and the opera. Frelinghuysen pursued both her passions as careers, successfully," writes Jennifer Huberdeau of the Berkshire Eagle. "She was the first woman to have a painting permanently placed in A.E. Gallatin's Museum of Living Art and in 1943, was included in Peggy Guggenheim's "Exhibition by 31 Women" at the Art Of This Century Gallery in New York. She performed with the New York City Opera from 1947 to 1950..." Click here to read the whole article.